IPS vs TN - Black Level & Homogenity Comparison

#1
lim wrote:
29 Sep 2017, 21:55
I totally can understand, in the beginning, I also had problems to evaluate the glow. And the only one solution probably is just to make your own experience with different models/units
THIS was a good advice. To make things clear for me, I took a third monitor from work and made my own comparison between them.

So, the main point of this video is to compare the Black Level & Homogenity of both IPS monitors to my old TN monitor. All other tests are only here, to provide you some extra information about the panels.
Note, that my camcorder is not very accurate and I don't have any professional equipment or light, like Lim. =) So the quality is a bit poor and youtube killed everything, that was left of it. For those who want, I will leave a link to download the original file.

And here are our test exemplars:
1.) Cheaper Acer B276HUL (IPS)
2.) Expensive Eizo Foris FS2735 (IPS)
3.) My old Samsung P2770H (TN + Film)

Have Fun!

Re: IPS vs TN - Black Level & Homogenity Comparison

#2
Hey, man, you just totally hit my taste with the 5cm per second ost. I got the Blu-Ray here and listened to this music many many many many hours. :)

Thanks for sharing your experience! I really like that you put in your old P2770H into the video, because this is AGAIN (not only against IPS, but also against current 2017 TN models) a good example of worse results of thinner panels and edge led solutions. I really cannot understand why manufacturers make a panel thinner and thinner when the homogeneity and illumination suffers (HUGE) from it.... I rather prefer a "5 centimeters" thick panel against a 0.5mm thick one with backlight bleed etc ... ;D

Will you keep the Acer B276HUL now? What is your next plan?
The Eizo was close as same as the Acer B276HUL in person?
And yes, Eizo cannot justify the price, to be honest. But when I could choose between a perfect illuminated Acer XF270HUA vs the Eizo FS2735 - I still would go with the Eizo. But you're right, the price is wrong and its only worth when you're an extreme enthusiast (maybe). The Acer has a much better price-performance ratio - It depends on how important these "small" advantages within the OSD / Design etc. for someone are.

Thanks for sharing

Edit: Oh and this is also why I still love beamers (except the home cinematic atmosphere and image size) - perfect illumination, less motion blur, and perfect viewing angles :). Next year I also will start to build a new home cinema and start with beamer reviews. I had to give up my old home cinema room ;(

Re: IPS vs TN - Black Level & Homogenity Comparison

#3
lim wrote:
01 Oct 2017, 14:37
Will you keep the Acer B276HUL now? What is your next plan?
The Eizo was close as same as the Acer B276HUL in person?
No, the Acer monitor is from my work and I will bring it back next week. Maybe, I will also take another monitor from work to compare, it's a pretty new 21:9 LG with an IPS panel. We'll see.

The Eizo is still better in person, as the Acer. I think, I should have done a second comparison from 2 meters away. Then you will notice, that Acer has two backlight-bleed spots and a slightly worse IPS glow on the left side.

Re: IPS vs TN - Black Level & Homogenity Comparison

#5
LOL, just my first try making pursuit camera test... Holding the camera in my hands xD

Backlight Strobbing | Overdrive Enhanced | 144HZ | Middle Screen
Backlight Strobbing | Overdrive Enhanced | 144HZ | Upper Screen
Normal Mode | Overdrive Enhanced | 144HZ | Middle Screen
Normal Mode | Overdrive Enhanced | 144HZ | Middle Screen

P.S. Another thing. I have an opportunity to buy pretty cheap an used "Spyder 3 Pro" calibration system. Is that thing worth it, or is it only good for professional work?

Re: IPS vs TN - Black Level & Homogenity Comparison

#6
LOL, just my first try making pursuit camera test... Holding the camera in my hands xD
Haha :) Without motion blur reduction (backlight scanning) there shouldn't be a real visible difference on the middle and upper screen

P.S. Another thing. I have an opportunity to buy pretty cheap an used "Spyder 3 Pro" calibration system. Is that thing worth it, or is it only good for professional work?
No not worth it for games.
1. Because your games won't read ICC profiles
2. Gaming monitors don't have that perfect homogeneity to calibrate. This means in the center you have another color temperature than at other areas while professional graphics monitors have much less deviation.
3. It will help mostly only for gamma, but you can change gamma easily within the software

It's worth when you plan to do some graphic design and you need color accuracy for software which reads ICC profiles. This mostly is only needed for print or pro video editing

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